The Ice is Melting – Ethics in the Arctic

The Ice is Melting – Ethics in the Arctic

When the Norwegian version of the book “The Ice is Melting – Ethics in the Arctic” was released in Svalbard Science Centre 2 February 2015, the venue was full.

18 February 2015
Text and photos by Sofia Mercadal, the Norwegian Polar Institute

The book is edited by Ole Arve Misund, managing director of UNIS, along with Kim Holmén, international director of the Norwegian Polar Institute, and Leif Magne Helgesen, pastor of Svalbard.

Ole Arve Misund at book launch in Longyearbyen 2 February 2015.

The evening began with words of welcome from Ole Arve Misund,
managing director of UNIS.

The publisher Fagbokforlaget describes the book thus:

“The ice in the Arctic is melting. Nowhere on earth can the changes in our climate be seen as clearly as here. What is happening? Are we heading for a catastrophe, or is this only a problem for polar bears and walruses? How will a warmer Arctic affect living conditions for people in Polynesia and Micronesia? What are our responsibilities as individuals in this situation? This book aims to extend your knowledge about climate, and simultaneously invites you to reflect on the ethical issues involved. Our hope is that readers will find the book inspiring and provocative! The authors represent a wide range of professions within academia, management, the media, natural science, the church, and museums. We share a belief in dialogue and cooperation. The climate crisis challenges us to work together across disciplinary, professional and national boundaries.”

Pastor Helgesen spoke about the thoughts and ideas that inspired the book. He hopes and believes that this book is important: he says it is full of pages, but hopefully also full of content.

Leif Helgesen, Sylvi Inez Liljegren and Stig Lægdene.

From left: Leif Helgesen, Sylvi Inez Liljegren and Stig Lægdene.

Pastor Helgesen discussed the book’s themes with two of the authors, Sylvi Inez Liljegren (Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation) and Stig Lægdene (principal of the Northern Norway Educational Centre of Practical Theology).

Kim Holmén, international director of the Norwegian Polar Institute, gave a brief presentation about climate change and its effects in Svalbard.

To understand climate change and its effects in Svalbard, we must create models where we can use the data we have available. Kim Holmén used a paper airplane and its ability to fly to show how even simple models can teach us something about complicated phenomena.

The evening also offered musical interludes. At the end of the evening, a copy of the book was given to Nina Frisak, Secretary to the Government, Office of the Prime Minister.

Order the book (in English or Norwegian) from the publisher Fagbokforlaget:
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