See a fast-flowing glacier surge forward!

See a fast-flowing glacier surge forward!

A time-lapse video of the tidewater glacier Kronebreen in Kongsfjorden from the summer 2014 is now available on YouTube. The video was put together by scientists from UNIS and the University of Edinburgh.

3 December 2014

In May 2014, scientists from UNIS and the University of Edinburgh (UK) set up seven cameras on Kronebreen in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. Kronebreen is a fast-flowing tidewater glacier (means it calves into the sea) and the idea behind the project was to monitor the speed of the glacier.

Five of the seven cameras successfully collected images from May until September this year, taking pictures every 30 minutes. One image from each day was put together into a time-lapse sequence that is now published on the UNIS YouTube channel.

The video was put together by UNIS adjunct professor Nick Hulton, PhD candidate Heïdi Sevestre and Penelope How together with master student Silje Smith-Jensen.

The images collected can be used to examine glacial processes – such as ice velocity, iceberg calving rates and glacier surface lake drainage.

This project is part of CRIOS (Calving Rates and Impact on Sea Level), a collaboration between UNIS, Edinburgh and Swansea University (UK), and funded by ConocoPhillips and Lundin.

See the YouTube video here:

See the video from the camera set-up:

See the sequel and “behind the scenes” video:

Setting up cameras on Kronebreen, Kongsfjorden, Svalbard

The team setting up one of the cameras on Kronebreen in May 2014. Photo: Heïdi Sevestre/UNIS

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