Part of the Research Council of Norway POLARPROG.

Project number: 246725
Project period: March 2015–March 2018

Norwegian Partner Institution: The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS)
Russian Partner Institution: The Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPE), Moscow
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Project manager: Associate Professor Lisa Baddeley (UNIS)

Aurora seen from the Kjell Henriksen Observatory
Latest news

Short project summary

The project aims to initiate a new collaboration between the two research groups through a joint study into how energy is dissipated into the upper atmosphere through interaction between the Sun’s magnetic field (IMF) and the Earth’s magnetic field. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and turbulence manifest themselves as periodic fluctuations in the atmospheric signatures of this energy deposition (such as temperature and density changes) and in the Earth’s magnetic field. By monitoring the frequency, magnitude and location of the waves on the ground it is possible to investigate the complex plasma processes and interactions happening in the Earth’s ionosphere/magnetosphere system. The most intense wave activity in the ULF frequency range (from fractions of mHz to few Hz) is persistently observed at high latitudes. They are identifiable in ground based instrumentation such as magnetic field monitoring stations (magnetometers), optical equipment and radars. The instrumentation located on Svalbard at Longyearbyen, Barentsburg, Hornsund and Ny-Ålesund thus allows a unique opportunity to study these waves over long time periods at high latitudes.

This connection between the IMF and the Earth’s magnetic fields produces two main areas of interest which have two different physical methods of interaction.  These will be the focus of the collaborative projects. In addition, the project will also involve stays on Svalbard for researchers from IPE as well as joint fieldwork trips to Barentsburg. Researchers from UNIS will travel to IPE for joint workshops.

Figure 1: A schematic showing the different current systems and regions inside the Earth’s magnetosphere. By monitoring changes in the Earth’s upper atmosphere (ionosphere), which is magnetically connected to the magnetosphere, we can understand the process of energy transfer between the two systems (adapted from Kivelson and Russel 1995).


ULF Wave modulated auroral structures seen in the meridian scanning photometer instrument at KHO. The structures move from north to south with a periodicity of 1.63mHz (~10 mins).

Figure 2: ULF Wave modulated auroral structures seen in the meridian scanning photometer instrument at KHO. The structures move from north to south with a periodicity of 1.63mHz (~10 mins).


ULF wave modulated auroral structures observed in All-Sky Camera data from Ny Ålesund. The four images are at 1 minute cadence (time shown at the top of each figure) and show the westward and southward propagation of the arcs (Baddeley et al. 2017).

Figure 3: ULF wave modulated auroral structures observed in All-Sky Camera data from Ny Ålesund. The four images are at 1 minute cadence (time shown at the top of each figure) and show the westward and southward propagation of the arcs (Baddeley et al. 2017).

 

Instrumentation utilized during the study:

 

Project Publications

Pilipenko V., O. Kozyreva, L. Baddeley, D. Lorentsen, and V. Belakhovsky, Suppression of the dayside magnetopause surface modes, Solar-Terrestrial Physics, in press, 2017

L. J. Baddeley, D. A. Lorentzen, N. Partamies, W. Denig, V. A. Pilipenko, K. Oksavik, X. –C., Chen and Y. Zhang, Equatorward Propagating Auroral Arcs driven by ULF Wave Activity: Multipoint Ground and Space based Observations in the Dusk Sector Auroral Oval, 122, 5, 5591-5605, DOI: 10.1002/2016JA023427., 2017

N. Yagova, N. Nosikova, L. Baddeley, O. Kozyreva, D.Lorentzen, and V. Pilipenko Non-triggered auroral substorms and long-period (1-4 mHz) geomagnetic and auroral luminosity pulsations in the polar cap, Ann. Geophys. 35,3, 365-376, 10.5194/angeo-35-365-2017, 2017

Belakhovsky, V.B., V.A. Pilipenko, Ya.A. Sakharov, D.L. Lorentzen, and S.N. Samsonov, Geomagnetic and ionospheric response to the interplanetary shock on January 24, 2012, Earth, Planets and Space, 69:105, doi:10.1186/s40623-017-0696-1, 2017

E. Fedorov, N. Mazur, V. Pilipenko, and L. Baddeley, Modeling the high-latitude ground response to the excitation of the ionospheric MHD modes by atmospheric electric discharge, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 121, doi:10.1002/2016JA023354, 2016

Belakhovsky V.B., Pilipenko V.A., Samsonov S.N., and Lorentzen D., Features of Pc5 pulsations of geomagnetic field, auroral emissions, and riometer absorption, Geomagnetism and Aeronomy, 56, No. 1, 42–58, 2016

News

August 2017
Dr. Olga Kozyreva from IPE presented work from the project at the recent IAGA (International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy) joint Assembly http://www.iapso-iamas-iaga2017.com/ in Cape Town, South Africa. Her presentation was entitled ‘In search of ground image of the magnetopause surface mode: Multi-instrument observations at Svalbard’.

June 2017
Assoc. Prof Lisa Baddeley and Prof. Dag Lorentzen made a second trip to the Schmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth in Moscow. Whilst in Moscow, they met with the Director of the Nuclear Physics Institute of Moscow State University, Professor Mikhail Panasyuk, to discuss possible future collaborations between the research groups. A special focus of possible collaborations was the recently launched LOMONOSOV satellite. Assoc. Prof. Baddeley and Prof. Lorentzen also gave an invited seminar at Moscow State University (Space physics studies and education in Svalbard) before embarking on a guided tour of the university campus and facilities. A particular highlight of the visit was a tour of the main University building, which is the highest of the seven Stalinist skyscrapers of Moscow.

Assoc. Prof Lisa Baddeley, Prof. Dag Lorentzen and Prof. Vyacheslav Pilipenko from IPE also met with Dr. Krasnoperov at the Geophysical Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences to discuss the ongoing reseach project and also education possibilities on Svalbard for Russian students: http://gcras.ru/news.php?n=153
A visit was also arranged to the Museum of the Cosmonauts which showcases the history of the Soviet Space program from its beginnings with the Sputnik program to the modern Russian space program with the new Vostochny Cosmodrome.
Work continued on several of the project work packages and a manuscript has now been submitted for review to Annales Geophysicae.

Prof. Panasyuk, Assoc. Prof. Baddeley, Prof. Lorentzen and Prof. Pilipenko

Prof. Panasyuk, Assoc. Prof. Baddeley, Prof. Lorentzen and Prof. Pilipenko

Prof. Pillipenko, Assoc. Prof. Baddeley, Prof. Lorentzen and Ms. Nosikova on the balcony of the Main building at Moscow State University with the city of Moscow in the background.

Prof. Pillipenko, Assoc. Prof. Baddeley, Prof. Lorentzen and Ms. Nosikova on the balcony of the Main building at Moscow State University with the city of Moscow in the background.

Ms. Nosikova, Assoc. Prof. Baddeley and Prof. Lorentzen outside the Main building of Moscow State University. The balcony from which the previous photograph was taken can be seen just above the orange brick work.

Ms. Nosikova, Assoc. Prof. Baddeley and Prof. Lorentzen outside the Main building of Moscow State University. The balcony from which the previous photograph was taken can be seen just above the orange brick work.

The Monument to the Conquerors of Space at Prospekt Mira in Moscow. The structure was built in 1964 to celebrate the achievements of the Soviet people in space exploration. The Museum of Cosmonautics is located inside the base of the monument.

The Monument to the Conquerors of Space at Prospekt Mira in Moscow. The structure was built in 1964 to celebrate the achievements of the Soviet people in space exploration. The Museum of Cosmonautics is located inside the base of the monument.

Assoc. Prof. Baddeley, Prof. Pillipenko, Prof, Lorentzen and Dr. Kalegaev (head of the laboratory) outside the Main building of Moscow State University.

Assoc. Prof. Baddeley, Prof. Pillipenko, Prof, Lorentzen and Dr. Kalegaev (head of the laboratory) outside the Main building of Moscow State University.

Prof. Pilipenko, Dr. Krasnoperov, Prof. Lorentzen and Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley outside the Geophysical Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Prof. Pilipenko, Dr. Krasnoperov, Prof. Lorentzen and Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley outside the Geophysical Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Strelka, one of the dogs launched into Space as part of the Soviet Space Program is on display in the museum. She orbited the Earth aboard Korabi-Sputnik 2 on 19th August 1960 before returning safely to Earth.

Strelka, one of the dogs launched into Space as part of the Soviet Space Program is on display in the museum. She orbited the Earth aboard Korabi-Sputnik 2 on 19th August 1960 before returning safely to Earth.

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May 2017
Dr. Olga Kozyreva and PhD student Nataliya Nosikova from IPE visited UNIS for a small workshop. Progress regarding the development of the algorithm to identify the ‘open’ geomagnetic field lines using photometer data from the KHO (including the new dataset from the 2016/2017 season) was discussed. A new research project following on from the work published by Yagova et al. (2017) was also discussed. Nataliya and Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley also utilized the GUISDAP (Grand Unified Incoherent Scatter Design and Analysis Package) software installed on the UNIS computers to analyse and identify datasets from the EISCAT Svalbard Radar which could be used in Work Package 3.

March/April 2017
Professor Vyacheslav Pilipenko from IPE and Dr. Vladimir Belakhovskii from The Polar Geophysical Institute (PGI) in Apatity visited researchers at UNIS for two weeks.  During that time Professor Pilipenko gave a lecture to the research staff and student in the group about the project.  The group visited the KHO and SuperDARN radar during their stay. A field excursion to Barentsberg was also arranged for Professor Pilipenko and Dr. Belakhovskii, along with Professor Lorentzen and Assoc. Professor Baddeley, from UNIS.  The party travelled to and from Barentsburg by snow mobile and spent overnight in Barentsburg.  A visit to the geophysical observatory (operated by PGI) and also the Kola Science Centre (operated by the Russian Academy of Sciences) was also arranged by Dr. Belakhovskii. A particular focus of the meeting was looking at dayside ULF waves observed on Svalbard (using ground magnetometer and photometer data) and how they relate to similar structures observed at lower latitudes. By comparing the frequency and structure of the waves it is possible to ascertain information regarding the shape of the Earth’s magnetic field and in particular if it is ‘open’ to that of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) from the Sun (allowing particles to enter into the Earth’s upper atmosphere from the Sun) or ‘closed’. Debate exists within the community however as to the location of the ‘open’ part of the magnetic field and it’s relation to the ULF waves.  This is one problem which this project hopes to address.

Prof. Vyacheslav Pilipenko delivers a lecture to the staff and student of the Space Physics Group at UNIS. Students from the Masters courses AGF-301 and AGF-304 also attended.

Dr. Vladimir Belakhovskii provides a summary of his recent work to the research group utilizing Tromsø and Svalbard EISCAT data.

A visit to the KHO and SuperDARN radars by the group (left to right): Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley (UNIS), Prof. Vyacheslav Pilipenko (IPE), Prof. Dag Lorentzen (UNIS) and Dr. Vladimir Dr. Belakhovskii. The EISCAT Svalbard radars and the Advent valley can be seen in the background.

Standing by the sign to Barentsburg (left to right): Prof. Dag Lorentzen (UNIS), Prof. Vyacheslav Pilipenko (IPE) and Dr. Vladimir Dr. Belakhovskii

The Geophysical Observatory in Barentsburg.

Inside the geophysical observatory with one of the on-site engineers.

The group outside the geophysical observatory in Barentsburg and preparing to head into the town on the snow mobiles.

The group outside the geophysical observatory in Barentsburg and preparing to head into the town on the snow mobiles.

Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley (UNIS) outside the Kola Science Centre in Barentsburg.

Inside the Kola Peninsula Science Centre enjoying some Russian hospitality and good discussions.

 

August 2016
Work from the project was presented at the VarSITI (Variability of the Sun and Its Terrestrial Impact) General Symposium in Bulgaria.

February 2016

awat_feb2016

Project members (from left to right): Dr. Olga Kozyreva (IPE), Prof. Dag Lorentzen (UNIS), Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley (UNIS), Prof. Vyacheslav Pilipenko (IPE) with Prof. Anatoly Petrukovich (Head of Space Plasma Department at the Russian Academy of Sciences)

2 researchers, Professor Lorentzen and Assoc. Professor Baddeley, from UNIS visited IPE in Moscow. In addition to small workshops with scientists from the institute and the Polar Geophysical Institute, Professor Lorentzen and Assoc. Professor Baddeley gave an invited seminar at the Russian Academy of Sciences. The visit also included a private tour of the museum dedicated to Russian achievements in space research.

awat_feb2016_

Prof. Dag Lorentzen (UNIS), Assoc. Prof. Lisa Baddeley (UNIS) with models of various Martian lander systems.

September 2015
Work from the project was presented at the Chapman Conference on Substorms held in Fairbanks, Alaska by PhD student Nataliya Nosikova (IPE).

nataliyanosikova

PhD student Nataliya Nosikova (IPE) presenting research from the project at the Chapman Conference on Substorms in Fairbanks, Alaska.

September 2015
Work from the project was presented at the joint EISCAT / optical meeting held in Hermanus, South Africa.

May 2015
Dr. Olga Kozyreva and Nataliya Nosikova from IPE visited UNIS as part of the project.  This was the first exchange visit of the project.  A number of data workshops and meetings were held.  Presentations were also given detailing the work presented at the EGU meeting and also in preparation for the up and coming meetings in September.

April 2015
Work from the project was presented at the annual European Geophysical Union (EGU) meeting in Vienna by Nataliya Nosikova from IPE.